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Teen Writers Critique Group

Teen Writers Critique Group


    Fiction-2011 Untied Shoelaces of the Mind Anthology

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    Joce
    Admin

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2011-08-03
    Age : 19

    Fiction-2011 Untied Shoelaces of the Mind Anthology

    Post by Joce on Sat Aug 06, 2011 9:25 pm

    Even through I don't reaaly get the title, I like this anthology, alright pay, both print and ebook publication. It's open to all/most genres.
    Submissions:
    Flash Fiction (up to 1000 words)
    Short Stories (1000-2000 words)
    From the site:
    2011 Anthology Submissions:

    The anthology will contain Untied Shoelaces of the Mind stories, as well as a 10-15 Bonus stories not available on our website.

    NEW Deadline is August 7, 2011.
    Submit like a regular story, mark at the top, "Anthology Submission" (Register as a writer and use the online submission form)
    2k or less words (800-1500 is ideal), if it's over 2k the beginning had better grab me like a vice
    If it's a reprint, please include where it was originally published
    For stories we haven't already published, we will pay $0.03/word up to $30 USD for story rights for the anthology
    Reprints are more than welcome, especially if more than one year old
    Submitting for Issue #5 will get you into the anthology if we accept a story for Issue #5
    Print Edition will be linked to on the Untied Shoelaces of the Mind homepage
    All contributors who provide an address will receive ONE contributor's copy. (your address can be set from within Settings if you have a story published by us)
    We may not have an ISBN (I can't guarantee this one way or another. I may have to select a different distributor than lulu.com to utilize ISBN)
    The printing and distribution will be handled by lulu.com
    6"x9" size with a 13 point times new roman font (I know that's an odd size, but it only adds a few cents to the cost, and it's so much nicer than 12 point)
    Print Editions with shipping will likely run close to $16 (give or take)
    PDF Download editions will run $1.25
    Kindle Versions should be available (I'm not sure on pricing for that)
    We're having a cover artwork contest (Contest)
    Questions or problems can be sent to geoffporter@yahoo.com (NO STORIES IN EMAIL--use online submission form)
    Please Note:
    We're going to be way more likely to ask for a revision (i.e., the plot is too thin, if you beef up the plot, we'll reconsider) with an Anthology Submission than a submission for the issue
    We have a deadline for stories with the anthology, and our intent is to accept 10-12 or more, with Issue #5 (at the time of this writing), we've selected four for publication, it might be six months before we get four more that are perfect enough.
    If you wait until the last minute to submit, we won't be sending you a revision request.
    We're looking for both reprints and original stories (stories that you love that you simply can't find a home for)

    Also an interview with the editors from Duotrope. (Thanks, Duotrope.):
    Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less. [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Fiction for the Mind
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Orson Scott Card's Intergalactic Medicine Show
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: If you publish fiction, who are your favorite fiction writers? If you publish poetry, who are your favorite poets? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Tracie McBride, James Dorr, Conda V. Douglas, Sheila Crosby
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We have a talented team of four editors, and all four must approve a story before it goes in our rag.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Make sure the piece has conflict. That's the chief thing we look for. Plot is very important to us. Scenes are better than exposition.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: Describe the ideal submission. [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: The ideal submission is laced with conflict, and contains at least three distinct scenes. I define scene as both an event and the characters reaction to the event.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Lack of conflict or poor plotting. Failure to give us contact information.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We don't do cover letters. An author's credentials mean nothing to us, all that matters is the quality of the story.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: How much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We don't always read a piece all the way through. Often we can tell from the beginning if it's not going to be right for us.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go though before it is accepted? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: All four editors have to approve of it. Often, if three editors like it, we get out our iron rods and beat the fourth one into accepting it.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We don't check the ezine everyday, to be honest. We go in there a couple of times a week and check out stories out. We have a very sophisticated story management system, which is very easy to use. Each editor has their own categories to deal with.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

    Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We embrace modern technology. The first piece of software I built professionally was a chemical weapons attack simulator for the United States Air Force, so we have some of the best software technology in the business.
    —Geoffrey C Porter, Editor in Chief on 06 June 2010

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